Christine was not informed when her ailing mother’s continuing healthcare funding was withdrawn, and was shocked when she received a bill many months later.

Posted on: September 30th, 2016 by Jane Shepley

With free guidance from our Information and Advice Line team, Christine highlighted the flaws in management of her mother’s assessment and recovered more than £11,000 in care funding.

Wynne was unable to make decisions for herself, so her daughter, Christine, held Lasting Power of Attorney and was her representative.

However, Christine was not informed when a re-assessment of Wynne’s eligibility for continuing healthcare funding was arranged, and it took place in October 2014 without her knowledge.

This review concluded that Wynne was no longer eligible for CHC funding, and a letter was sent to her at her care home.

Wynne didn’t have the mental capacity to interpret this information and her daughter was still unaware of the change in funding.

Wynne sadly died in June 2015. And in the following months Christine was shocked to be informed that her CHC funding had been stopped in December, and that she owed the local authority £11,500 for her mother’s unpaid care.

Christine felt she had grounds for appeal, and in April 2016 she called our free Information and Advice Line for guidance.

Our Specialist Adviser booked a consultation with Christine and they had a detailed conversation about healthcare funding during Wynne’s final years.

Our adviser supported Christine by clarifying three breaches of the CHC National Framework that could form the grounds for Christine’s appeal:

• Wynne was denied the right to have proper representation at the assessment review.
• Wynne was not appropriately informed of the outcome (via Christine).
• Funding was withdrawn without the knowledge of Wynne’s representative.

Our advisor followed-up by emailing these points to Christine in detail, referring to the relevant paragraphs in the National Framework. He sent Christine a copy of the Framework and of our Navigational Toolkit.

Following her free advice from Beacon, Christine set out her concerns to the Clinical Commissioning Group’s appeals team.

Just one month later they conceded that the management of Wynne’s CHC assessment had been flawed and agreed to recompense the £11,500 care fees that Christine had paid.

All our advice and support for Christine was free, through our Information and Advice Service.

All calls to us are confidential, and we’ve changed the names of these clients to protect their anonymity.